THE STONE HOUSE TAVERN

A Brattleboro Words Trail Site

The Stone House Tavern:

Chesterfield, NH

A modern-day photo of the Old Stone House Tavern’s popular ballroom, complete with fiddlers bench. Courtesy of the Chesterfield Historical Society.

Take Route 9 East from Exit 3 in Brattleboro, and in a few miles you’ll see a crossroads where on the left sits a classic, well-preserved stone farmhouse. Built in 1831 and operating today as a museum, locals know this storied building by its historical uses, calling it “the antique bookstore,” “the Inn,” or it’s official name, “the Old Stone House Tavern.”

In its original heyday in the late 19th century, the Old Stone House was a popular rest stop for travelers between Brattleboro and Keene, and a hotspot for music lovers looking to dance to the latest ragtime

In 1995, Constantine “Deeko” Broutsas purchased it, renovated it—taking care to preserve its original features where possible—and opened a shop to sell antiques, rare books, and fine art. Broustas’ has since passed, and his shop with him, but his will generously offered the Old Stone House Tavern to the Chesterfield Historical Society.

Read more of the Stone House’s story at the Chesterfield Historical Society’s website.

Site research in progress. Check back soon for more of the story.

On The Map

The Stone House Tavern on Route 9 in Chesterfield, NH

The Stone House Tavern

About the Research sites

The Brattleboro Words Project is working with the community to identify specific sites and themes significant to the study of words in Brattleboro and surrounding towns. Research Teams – classrooms/teachers, amateur historians, veterans, writers, artists and other community members — will produce audio segments and other work to be incorporated into audio walking, biking and driving tours tours.

Research Team Leader

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