Wesselhoeft Water Cure

Opened in 1852 under the direction of C.W. Grau. The Water cure in downtown Brattleboro was visited by many notable people of the time, who came to escape the rapidly industrializing world. This site is one of 40 historic places that will be Researched and made a part of the Brattleboro Words Trail 

About the Research sites

The Brattleboro Words Project is working with the community to identify specific sites and themes significant to the study of words in Brattleboro and surrounding towns. Brattleboro Words Project leaders are helping to build Research Teams — classrooms/teachers, amateur historians, veterans, writers, artists and other community members — who will produce audio segments and other work to be incorporated into audio walking, biking and driving tours tours available on the BrattleboroWordsProject.org website.  

The Story of the Water Cure

1850 - 1860

After the death of Wesselhoeft and the closing of his water-cure, there were attempts made by others to continue water treatments.  A wealthy New Yorker, Bayard Clark, who had regained his health under the treatment by Wesselhoeft, in an effort to help William Klinge, who had been superintendent of Wesselhoeft’s bathing department, bought a property opposite the water cure and allowed Mr. Klinge to run it for the accommodation of patients unable to get rooms at the Wesselhoeft place.

1860 - 1880

After the death of Wesselhoeft and the closing of his water-cure, there were attempts made by others to continue water treatments.  A wealthy New Yorker, Bayard Clark, who had regained his health under the treatment by Wesselhoeft, in an effort to help William Klinge, who had been superintendent of Wesselhoeft’s bathing department, bought a property opposite the water cure and allowed Mr. Klinge to run it for the accommodation of patients unable to get rooms at the Wesselhoeft place.

1880 - 1900

After the death of Wesselhoeft and the closing of his water-cure, there were attempts made by others to continue water treatments.  A wealthy New Yorker, Bayard Clark, who had regained his health under the treatment by Wesselhoeft, in an effort to help William Klinge, who had been superintendent of Wesselhoeft’s bathing department, bought a property opposite the water cure and allowed Mr. Klinge to run it for the accommodation of patients unable to get rooms at the Wesselhoeft place.

On The Map

The water cure is located at 118 Elliot street
stuff about location
nearby things
why the location was important

Wantastiquet

The Research Team

Name Goes Here

Name Goes Here

Position

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.
Name Goes Here

Name Goes Here

Position

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the module Advanced settings.